Race & Class, July 2014

The latest issue of Race & Class examines the consequences of the co-option of charities and voluntary organisations within the immigration detention market. ‘The business of child detention: charitable co-option, migrant advocacy and activist outrage’, by Imogen Tyler, Nick Gill, Deirdre Conlon and Ceri Oeppen, asks if the neoliberal trend towards the ‘professionalisation of dissent’ has diminished political opposition to immigration detention in Britain and the wider world.

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Articles

The business of child detention: charitable co-option, migrant advocacy and activist outrage, by Imogen Tyler, Nick Gill, Deirdre Conlon and Ceri Oeppen

Investigated or ignored? An analysis of race-related deaths since the Macpherson report by Harmit Athwal and Jon Burnett

Labour militancy deferred: racial state interventions and the California farm worker struggle by Adrian Cruz

Rufus E. Fennell: a literary Pan-Africanist in Britain by Christian Høgsbjerg

Commentary

We are our own educators!’: Buzz Johnson, people’s publisher by Chris Searle

Swiss referendum: flying the flag for nativism by Reem Abu-Hayeh, Graham Murray and Liz Fekete

Reviews

Dirty Wars: the world is a battlefield by Jeremy Scahill (Arun Kundnani)

Enoch Powell and the Making of Postcolonial Britain by Camilla Schofield (Michael Higgs)

No Place to Call Home: inside the real lives of Gypsies and Travellers by Katharine Quarmby (Ryan Erfani-Ghettani)

Paramilitarism and the Assault on Democracy in Haiti by Jeb Sprague (Boaz Anglade)

Pregnant on Arrival: making the illegal immigrant by Eithne Luibheid (Elena Moreo)

Pan-Africanism and Communism: the Communist International, Africa and the Diaspora 1919-1939 by Hakim Adi (Christian Høgsbjerg)

In a Time of Burning by Cheran (Chris Searle)

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Race & Class is published quarterly, in January, April, July and October, by Sage Publications for the Institute of Race Relations; individual subscriptions are £34/$63.